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I thought the XFR calipers were just a large single piston.
 

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I thought the XFR calipers were just a large single piston.
It’s 8 years since I had mine, but feel sure it’s a twin piston on the front and single piston sliding caliper on the rear
 

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Twin piston but pushing from the inside unlike proper performance brakes which have pistons on both sides to ensure even application of pressure from pad to discs.
 

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Twin piston but pushing from the inside unlike proper performance brakes which have pistons on both sides to ensure even application of pressure from pad to discs.
I'd usually call that 4 piston.
 

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Twin piston but pushing from the inside unlike proper performance brakes which have pistons on both sides to ensure even application of pressure from pad to discs.
That’s how I remember them
 

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Two pistons on each side of the disc, so four pot calipers
Pot and piston. Same.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The XFR is yes. But not the one I quoted.


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Lol, it’s all getting messy, MSport and XFR calipers, then we get MSport rears thrown into the mix 🤣
 

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Just a FYI - if changing calipers, you may well upset the front/rear balance and/or pedal feel/travel as the new calipers will have a different volume of fluid in them, and the master cylinder will be matched to the old ones.

Not as straightforward as just changing calipers.
 

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1. Clean up the discs/rotors, preferably get them skimmed/machined.
2. Get a set of Porterfield R4-S carbon kevlar brake pads, see here: Brake Pad: Hawk, Pagid, Porterfield, Raybestos, Stoptech, Wilwood
3. As soon as the new pads are fitted bed them in: 10 or so heavy brake applications from say 60 mph down to say 10 mph (do NOT stop!) one after the other until you can smell very hot brakes. Makes me dizzy but it works! Also make sure you do a "cool down lap" afterwards otherwise you risk the dreaded brake pad material deposition.

I fitted the Porterfield pads to my F-Type (exact same front brakes as the XFR, same size rear brakes but different calipers and pads to the XFR) some 2.5 years ago now and they have been great - smooth, progressive, fairly quiet, powerful when called upon and waaaaaay less dust than the horrible stock pads.
On the linked page you want the AP 1448 for the front brakes and the AP 1449 for the rears, these are the R4-S (S = street), you do not want the R4 as they are track pads and not suitable for a daily driver.
 

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Just a FYI - if changing calipers, you may well upset the front/rear balance and/or pedal feel/travel as the new calipers will have a different volume of fluid in them, and the master cylinder will be matched to the old ones.

Not as straightforward as just changing calipers.

The volume of fluid won't matter really, you'd just top it up to suit, but the piston/annulus area will be different and give more/less force based on that area. But a good point anyway.
 
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