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And, your not safe with a new petrol Jag either! They've put an exhaust filter on that now.... So far in 1600 miles from new I've had 3 amber warnings and 1 red (today). With the petrol it only re-gen's below 50mph, low revs for 15 minutes but dont expect 4 warnings 2 months.
The 1600 miles have been a mixture of short journeys and I reckon ~1000+ miles motorway.
 

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Similar problem to the OP. 3.0 diesel XF. Thanks for the help in this post. I rang the warranty people who told me to call out the Jaguar assistance.

Apparently there is a bit of a fault with the flap on the throttle body. It sticks and the air is drawn in via the EGR filling the DPF quickly. He replaced the throttle body, checked the software (it was up to date) and then we went for a run and he checked again. Soot down from 26 grams to 5 grams. Sorted.

Well impressed with Jaguar warranty and Jaguar assistance.
 

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Speaking of which,... My car's about to run out of warranty at 4 years old but only 14k odd miles. Any suggestions about renewing warranty... Jaguar dealer, independent or none?
All suggestions welcome.
 

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Since nobody bothered to respond , I would go without and save the cash. Having had the XJ and X260 3.0 diesels most of the issues I experienced was through my own tinkering such as , broken wheel stud , decimated rear caliper The most expensive fix I had was a new throttle body on the XF which cost 600 euro including labour.
 

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Just thought I would give you an update on how my exhaust filter red warning has been resolved in case it happens to anyone else. Jaguar recovery came out to the car and found that the filter was not blocked at all (only 5%). It has done a regeneration about 100 miles ago but had not told the computer that it was done. The technical reset the computer an applied a software update and said it should not happen again, but if it does, just call them out again. In any event, the filter was clean.
Afternoon guys,

I got DPF filter full (Red light) followed by limp mode.
So I called out an amazingly help chap who specialised in DPF cleans and remaps.
He did some digging and said that on these 3.0 Jags and Evokes/discovery's etc when they fail to do a passive DPF clean (whilst driving it dumps additional fuel in to burn the soot) it purges the unburnt fuel into the engine oil. This is then measured and can be seen as a fuel to oil percentage in a diag tool field. When that value gets above a certain figure it trips the red light straight away rather than go to amber first. This value can be reset with a highend diag tool or a Jaguar garage. They should reset it along with the last serviced mileage at every oil change.
 

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Afternoon guys,

I got DPF filter full (Red light) followed by limp mode.
So I called out an amazingly help chap who specialised in DPF cleans and remaps.
He did some digging and said that on these 3.0 Jags and Evokes/discovery's etc when they fail to do a passive DPF clean (whilst driving it dumps additional fuel in to burn the soot) it purges the unburnt fuel into the engine oil. This is then measured and can be seen as a fuel to oil percentage in a diag tool field. When that value gets above a certain figure it trips the red light straight away rather than go to amber first. This value can be reset with a highend diag tool or a Jaguar garage. They should reset it along with the last serviced mileage at every oil change.
I'm afraid your DPF specialist is wrong.
It is true that a post injection of diesel is made to get burnt in the DP filter when the filter differential pressure reaches a preset figure. The issue with oil dilution is a natural side-effect because an amount of the unburnt diesel in the cylinders will get past the piston rings. If the regen' of the DPF isn't completed on any given journey, it will try and do it on any subsequent journey(s) until it is. This why short journeys aren't good for a modern diesel engine.
Added to this, one or two JLR models with Euro 6 engines have an inherent fault where the DPF has been moved too far away from the heat of the engine and for the reason given above, oil dilution has become a big problem. The algorithm the car uses to calculate oil dilution determines when the "service required" warning pops up which on these models occurs thousands of miles before the expected service schedule should be.
So, it's not the oil dilution calculation that has triggered your red DPF Full warning.

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I'm afraid your DPF specialist is wrong.
It is true that a post injection of diesel is made to get burnt in the DP filter when the filter differential pressure reaches a preset figure. The issue with oil dilution is a natural side-effect because an amount of the unburnt diesel in the cylinders will get past the piston rings. If the regen' of the DPF isn't completed on any given journey, it will try and do it on any subsequent journey(s) until it is. This why short journeys aren't good for a modern diesel engine.
Added to this, one or two JLR models with Euro 6 engines have an inherent fault where the DPF has been moved too far away from the heat of the engine and for the reason given above, oil dilution has become a big problem. The algorithm the car uses to calculate oil dilution determines when the "service required" warning pops up which on these models occurs thousands of miles before the expected service schedule should be.
So, it's not the oil dilution calculation that has triggered your red DPF Full warning.

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okay.... I think I'm understanding that.
So did the red light come on because of just too many failed DPF passive regens because the live data was showing my DPF @ 4%. This was slowly going down whilst out for a drive along the motorway at a steady 70mph until I got the first overboost reading and then it started to climb?

Cheers for the knowledge
 

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okay.... I think I'm understanding that.
So did the red light come on because of just too many failed DPF passive regens because the live data was showing my DPF @ 4%. This was slowly going down whilst out for a drive along the motorway at a steady 70mph until I got the first overboost reading and then it started to climb?

Cheers for the knowledge
The red warning with no preceding Amber warnings could be an indication of a failed pressure switch or wiring.

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Not really.

Get the issue sorted by either your own two hands, getting some one to repair it at cost, or under warranty.

Then once that is done - drive the car once a week to give its 'lungs' a good clear out and prevent the DPF from clogging up.

I had two diesel XF 3.0L bi-turbos, never had any issues with the DPF directly.

The intercooler losing pressure by splitting on the first one threw up a warning, and was £600 to replace, but the car was far from troublesome.

Newer JLR products suffer from oil dilution as John says above, due to the DPF being too far away from the manifold, but the XF and XE don't suffer from this.
 
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When this happened on my 2.0D, it turned out that the upper DPF temperature sensor was loose and the bottom one had fallen out.
I tightened the top one and reinserted the bottom one. I also replaced the pressure differential sensor (£100 from Jag parts).
Subsequent run, using my Autel AP200 OBD reader / iPhone showed the correct temperatures had been obtained to allow the DPF to rejen and clear itself.
The run took about 20 mins at roughly constant 40mph. No need to thrash it, an 'Italian tuneup' doesn't do any good.

It's disappointing to have something like this happen, but the XF is not one of the affected platforms for the RED dpf issue, so be methodical and find the root cause of the problem, beacuse it's not the DPF.

Edit: one other thing, when the soot levels fell to the base percentage, the red DPF warning was still showing on the dash, it took a power cycle, to sort that. Leave it off for a minute or so and when it powers up, the warning should have gone.
 

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Could be worth double checking what oil is being used when servicing your car and how often you are getting the oil changed - especially if the inferred oil dilution value is high (I think 8+ basically means change the oil!)

A good quality C1 oil at least twice a year is what I did and I never saw an amber or red DPF light/warning. Although, I did monitor the soot readings and go out on active regen runs myself...possibly to the demise of my crankshaft.
 

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When this happened on my 2.0D, it turned out that the upper DPF temperature sensor was loose and the bottom one had fallen out.
I tightened the top one and reinserted the bottom one. I also replaced the pressure differential sensor (£100 from Jag parts).
Subsequent run, using my Autel AP200 OBD reader / iPhone showed the correct temperatures had been obtained to allow the DPF to rejen and clear itself.
The run took about 20 mins at roughly constant 40mph. No need to thrash it, an 'Italian tuneup' doesn't do any good.

It's disappointing to have something like this happen, but the XF is not one of the affected platforms for the RED dpf issue, so be methodical and find the root cause of the problem, beacuse it's not the DPF.

Edit: one other thing, when the soot levels fell to the base percentage, the red DPF warning was still showing on the dash, it took a power cycle, to sort that. Leave it off for a minute or so and when it powers up, the warning should have gone.
I remember the full thread and diagnostic on that. I have never seen such persistence.Great the fault was found and fixed too.
 
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