Jaguar Forum banner

1 - 20 of 69 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I must have burnt a bit of oil in the last few k but this electronic oil level indicator is so temperamental

My garage floor is almost flat, sloping downwards ever so slightly at the rear, perhaps a few mm but I always check the oil there. Still shows full when checked as per instructions.

Sometime I keep it on the drive, again almost flat and when I check there, sloping more at the rear, it says its ok but halfway down on the indicator.

I just turn off the ignition normally and the oil level re-appears when I next turn on.

Yesterday it was half way down on the drive and this morning it say add 1L! Obviously not per instructions so I went out for the day, came back, parked in garage and checked after 15mins after cool down and still says full.

I hope this doesn't lead to overfilled xf's... A less critical eye could easily mistake the tiniest of gradient and cold check to prompt a fill up which would overfill it.

Hmmm

Still puzzled me tho.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,853 Posts
I have found that consistent readings can only be attained after an overnight stop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
592 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Interesting

I thought you should always measure when oil has been ran at operating temperature and been allowed to drain back slightly.

My BMW always read low, practically off th dipstick when cold and sat overnight but at operating temperature it was just under max.

Jag seems to follow the same trend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
The diesel variety is frustrating in a different way: it will only display when the engine is within a certain (warm-ish) temperature range, and only from about 10-15 minutes after the engine is stopped, and for about 5 minutes until it gets too cold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,139 Posts
I check the oil level many times in different 'level' places to get a feel for whether a top-up is really needed. A dip stick would be more convenient. My R does need half or one litre between services.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,853 Posts
The diesel variety is frustrating in a different way: it will only display when the engine is within a certain (warm-ish) temperature range, and only from about 10-15 minutes after the engine is stopped, and for about 5 minutes until it gets too cold.
Weird - I check mine first thing in the mornings, stone cold engine, without problems? But I do agree that the tiniest degree of slope alters the reading.

Still think an old fashioned dipstick is better, but there again people ignored those too (you listening, current Mrs Wilf?).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,126 Posts
Yep, same here........any slight difference in floor level produces a different reading :(

So that I don't overfill I wait until most areas I try it in say fill up half litre AND then get one that says fill up 1 litre...

It usually turns out I need half a litre every 2-3 months - is that bad?

In my Jap petrols I never had to add any oil.....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,853 Posts
Frequent key to these engines not using oil is to NOT baby them "running in".
 

·
Detailing Guru
Joined
·
1,064 Posts
Toyota Service manager told me and insists that oil levels should be checked while the engine is hot as oil expands when hot .... Pedantic maybe ??
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,853 Posts
Buttercup doesn't use oil.

Loses it from various places, yes, but not use.
 

·
Saintly Member
Joined
·
1,644 Posts
I am one of the lucky ones my XF has what they used to call a dipstick or on here a PEKEM:D

You could always get the CORRECT level by fitting one of these: 022.jpg

Nothing left to chance 98yrs ago;)

Alfie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,418 Posts
Yes I have fitted a lotbof those & changed the glass lower seals when they perish but as most were leather they lasted longer than the new fibre or rubber ones.
Still are used on slow running gear boxes on some plant equipment.

Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2
 

·
Saintly Member
Joined
·
1,644 Posts
Yes I have fitted a lotbof those & changed the glass lower seals when they perish but as most were leather they lasted longer than the new fibre or rubber ones.
Still are used on slow running gear boxes on some plant equipment.

Sent from my GT-N7100 using Tapatalk 2
Would look good under an XF eh lol.

Alfie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
I'm not so sure that having a dipstick is of such a benefit. Thinking about the cost of the electronic smarts required to activate a non-mechanical measuring device makes me think that there is a good reason for going electronic.

Perhaps the dipstick method is so inaccurate that drivers were causing more harm than good by overfilling with oil?

Whilst electronic measurement is cumbersome to some, I find that it's easy to do every time I refill the car with fuel - it's the last thing I do before leaving the forecourt.

And although I'm a traditionalist when it comes to these things, I appreciate that it's more accurate this way - or I am led to believe it is, at least...
 

·
Saintly Member
Joined
·
1,644 Posts
I'm not so sure that having a dipstick is of such a benefit. Thinking about the cost of the electronic smarts required to activate a non-mechanical measuring device makes me think that there is a good reason for going electronic.

Perhaps the dipstick method is so inaccurate that drivers were causing more harm than good by overfilling with oil?

Whilst electronic measurement is cumbersome to some, I find that it's easy to do every time I refill the car with fuel - it's the last thing I do before leaving the forecourt.

And although I'm a traditionalist when it comes to these things, I appreciate that it's more accurate this way - or I am led to believe it is, at least...
Hi Ivanov,

Nope disagree there mate.....dipstick ever time for me especially with a DPF equipped diesel... you cant see or smell the oil on a gauge same with autoboxes the clue to a knackered one is the oil colour and smell, bright red good brown smelly bad;)

Alfie
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
Yeah, there is that, agreed. But looks like it's gone the way of the dodo, along with grease nipples and such like. I doubt that Jaguar will return to dipsticks: it appears that engine, transmission and diff oils are not expected to be maintained or serviced by owners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
I'm not so sure that having a dipstick is of such a benefit. Thinking about the cost of the electronic smarts required to activate a non-mechanical measuring device makes me think that there is a good reason for going electronic.

Perhaps the dipstick method is so inaccurate that drivers were causing more harm than good by overfilling with oil?
I don't know a thing about the I4 and V8s, but on the V6, the idea of the electronic dipstick was to reduce the extreme sensitivity to even the tiniest slope due to the peculiar sump design. They did this by averaging the reading displayed, rather than showing an actual reading, to prevent overfills. If you really want to know, the PDI manual tells you how.

Electronic Dipstick Service Operation
To allow for the actual oil level to be verified, a
service mode exists to give access to live oil level
readings.
In order to have a correct reading, the following
conditions must be met:
l The vehicle MUST be parked on a level area of
ground. The sensor installation is very sensitive
to vehicle tilt in the for-aft direction: 1/2 degree
vehicle tilt corresponds to up to 0.5L
measurement error.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,853 Posts
Wow, I simply had not assumed that degree of sensitivity to the slope. Good find.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,366 Posts
Highly sophisticated spirit level by the sound of it
 
1 - 20 of 69 Posts
Top