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If it’s an amber warning just drive the car for 20-50miles on an a-road or motorway. It will regenerate itself.
Just do this, the '08 XF I had needed this doing and once I found the distance required to clean it had a regular route for doing it. It was about 10 miles then 10 miles back and all sorted as 20 miles in all. Needs to be above 40mph almost constantly.
 
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Discussion Starter #22
Just do this, the '08 XF I had needed this doing and once I found the distance required to clean it had a regular route for doing it. It was about 10 miles then 10 miles back and all sorted as 20 miles in all. Needs to be above 40mph almost constantly.
Agree. the reason I suggested longer was if the car has sit for a long time, it needs a longer time to regenerate but if it is routinely driven, a shorter distance will do. Also when the warning clears is not always when the dpf is as regenerated as a new one. I have covered that in first post. So I personally continue driving the car for atleast 20mins after warning is gone.
 

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I was assured by the service department at the time I had the car (2010/11/12) that once the warning light had gone out the DPF was clean and regeneration finished so going further was a waste of time and fuel so went with that.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Using SDD I had a live reading of soot mass in grams. SDD instruction was to continue until mass is dropped under 6gr. Warning did clear when it was 25gr. Starting off it was 42gr. However my car was sitting for several minths and warning came on after about 1000miles when started to drive it. Not sure if it’s because of that. Will try next time it comes on and report.
Obviously when warning is gone, it means the dpf is clear enough but if it’s not done completely it will fill up faster and next warning shows up earlier. Like yoU are not using the full capacity.
 

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Had the warning for 1st time ever in my car last Tuesday just as I was setting out on a 250 mile journey, it cleared after about 20 mins driving, just after I got on the m/way. I'm hoping it was a 1 off.
 

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Yes I noticed that revving the engine as people do will slow the process. Instead driving around 60mph but playing with the pedal as explained in first post will speed it up. Also it doesn’t do in it one go. It tend to stay at some levels for a while and then drops.
Aye, I think it's to do with keep boost at a minimum and not diverting hot exhaust gases back to the turbo; I'm assuming this is why Jaguar recommend just sticking at motorway speeds in the normal fashion.


If it’s an amber warning just drive the car for 20-50miles on an a-road or motorway. It will regenerate itself.

my personal experience is that fuel additives will shorten the life span of plastic parts and seals.So they would me my last solution.
What about fuels like BP Ultimate, would this not be similar to using additives?

I've never even considered the effect of fuel additives on plastic parts and seals to be honest, but I don't know enough about it all. One thing I do know for sure from a lot of experimenting is that Archoil AR6400-D Max definitely helps keep the soot levels down. Whether it be from reducing the creation of soot in the first place or by making the burning off of the soot passively more efficient I don't know - but it definitely works.
 

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Discussion Starter #27 (Edited)
Aye, I think it's to do with keep boost at a minimum and not diverting hot exhaust gases back to the turbo; I'm assuming this is why Jaguar recommend just sticking at motorway speeds in the normal fashion.




What about fuels like BP Ultimate, would this not be similar to using additives?

I've never even considered the effect of fuel additives on plastic parts and seals to be honest, but I don't know enough about it all. One thing I do know for sure from a lot of experimenting is that Archoil AR6400-D Max definitely helps keep the soot levels down. Whether it be from reducing the creation of soot in the first place or by making the burning off of the soot passively more efficient I don't know - but it definitely works.
I agree with your idea about second turbo route that bypasses the DPF. My impression was acceleration make dpf hot and loosen the soot and cruising will take it away. But it was my guess. At the end the way ECM controls the process matters.

I never used an additive for dpf but from what I learned, many of them work by increasing exhaust temperature. Or lower the regeneration needed temp. On the other hand I think ECM controls exhaust temperature to some extent.

I am starting to think higher level fuels are not good. I was with my friend who is a Costco member and he encouraged me fill my tank there. It was their higher level diesel. 20miles further both my air intakes cracked under an average acceleration to join motorway. I recently rebuilt my engine and I am sure their were in good shape.
also I used an engine flush for 5mins before an oil change on my other car and my real crankshaft seal failed. I am not going to use any additive unless I am sure it will not affect plastics.
I have been using Shell V-power without a problem though. I am not saying additives will cause failure but definitely will definitely accelerate it.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Had the warning for 1st time ever in my car last Tuesday just as I was setting out on a 250 mile journey, it cleared after about 20 mins driving, just after I got on the m/way. I'm hoping it was a 1 off.
During lockdown it happened twice even though first time I was sure it was fully regen. It’s an amber light. So long as you don’t ignore it until it changes to red you are fine.
 

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I feel like I'm counting the days and miles before my intake manifolds split :censored:
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I feel like I'm counting the days and miles before my intake manifolds split :censored:
I hope my case was coincidence but they shouldn’t have used plastic for a part that is very difficult to replace and is exposed to high levels of dynamic loadings.
 

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I hope my case was coincidence but they shouldn’t have used plastic for a part that is very difficult to replace and is exposed to high levels of dynamic loadings.
I saw that Volvo was having issues with plastic intake manifolds as well, although I think it was more to do with melting and the potential of a fire. The recalled all models as appropriate. I agree though, considering how time consuming it is to get to it, surely a lightweight metal/alloy would be better?
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Or atleast make them cheap! £200 for a pair of after market parts made of plastic is expensive. Let alone OE.
 
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