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Discussion Starter #1
I got the amber warning DPF full few days ago.
My car was sitting for over a year because I was doing an engine rebuild and I have covered about 400miles since it’s back to life.

my impression was you just take it to relatively long trip and you are fine but 20-30mins trips at speeds below 50mph didn’t help. I even cleared the code and it came back after some miles.

Since I started playing with SDD I could see the forced DPF regen function. Today I tried it. First you have to take it on the road. So needs a laptop with a healthy battery that can last 1hr atleast and an assistant for safety. The instructions says it takes 15mins but it took 60mins in my case. I could see a live reading of mass of DPF contamination (cannot remember the correct term). The instructions says click the button after reading is below 6grams. First off it was 45grams! It was about mid way on the indicator on screen with top being 140 (not sure why it wasn’t linear)
Running at high revs didn’t seem to help nor driving around 40mph. For first 20-30mins I could smell it and feel the change in exhaust sound but the number didn’t drop at all and in some occasions it increased!
Then I headed to an A road and set it on CC at 60mph. Barely helped but it dropped to 38grams. At this point I realised that when the car goes downhill the reading drops but when I go uphill or accelerate it doesn’t. So I started simulating this. I accelerated for few seconds and left the pedal to roll. Using this method the reading dropped below 25gr In 5mins when the warning also cleared! ( it should have been below 6). I continued Another 30mins until I reached 3.8gr because I was away from home and I continued until I got home.

I have some recommendations based on my experience today:
-it will take much longer than 20mins to properly regen the dpf ( even though the warning clear at 25gr which is way above acceptable limit). People see this warning because of short trips and if ignored or forced to cleared, you probably have a lot to clean.
-it will take much longer than 20mins to properly regen the dpf ( even though the warning clear at 25gr which is way above acceptable limit). People see this warning because of short trips and if ignored or forced to cleared, you probably have a lot to clean.
-it will take much longer than 20mins to properly regen the dpf ( even though the warning clear at 25gr which is way above acceptable limit). People see this warning because of short trips and if ignored or forced to cleared, you probably have a lot to clean.
  • it took me 50miles round trip but If You play with the pedal as I tried above, you might need less.
  • don’t give up just when you see the error is gone. Continue at least double the time you already past if you want a proper clean.
  • Consider in my case, I forced the regen. Maybe you need a longer trip if you cannot force it just to make it start the regen. I did many 20-30trips and never got DPF regen started.
-don’t just replace dpf when you see the error keeps coming back.
- considering I was on A road, the regen seem to happen in steps. Maybe it takes some rest to cool down the exhaust. Reading stayed much longer at 42gr, then 38gr, then 10gr and 7gr. So “maybe” it doesn’t regenerate all of the mass in one go if you don’t force it. Specially if it is done based on the mileage you might see the warning back before next time it does it.
 

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Works quicker if you lock it in a lower gear I found with the 2.7D I had.
 

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Very interesting write up on how these things work!

Makes one even more happy about having left the diesel fold three years ago, although I fortunately never had any DPF issues during the four years I had my XFS. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Works quicker if you lock it in a lower gear I found with the 2.7D I had.
I had a live reading and locking in the lower gear didn’t help in my case. However I agree it helps the DPF to build up the temperature faster or maybe helping car to go to regen mode but once it’s started I doubt it will help.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very interesting write up on how these things work!

Makes one even more happy about having left the diesel fold three years ago, although I fortunately never had any DPF issues during the four years I had my XFS. ;)
I am new to this and still learning as my XFS is my first diesel ever and I am surprised with the engine response compared to my previous S-type 3.0 petrol maybe because of turbos or 2 extra gears this one has.
 

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I am new to this and still learning as my XFS is my first diesel ever and I am surprised with the engine response compared to my previous S-type 3.0 petrol maybe because of turbos or 2 extra gears this one has.
That would be an interesting comparison to hear about one day when you have the time, I'd be very intrigued/interested to know your thoughts on that!!.. (y)
 

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In S Type days the 2.7D was more popular than the 3.0 petrol because it went faster, used less fuel and the RFL was cheaper.
 

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Towing helps to keep the DPF clean as well as using low Ash engine oil. I have never had any DPF problems with either Jacque the Jag or my previous Citroen C5 2.0 HDI. As long as the engine is under load there will be no DPF faults in addition to using a high quality low ash engine oil and decent diesel too.
 

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I am new to this and still learning as my XFS is my first diesel ever and I am surprised with the engine response compared to my previous S-type 3.0 petrol maybe because of turbos or 2 extra gears this one has.
True, the 3.0 in S tune, especially remapped, is an amazing engine for a diesel. When in sport+dynamic the throttle response of the XFS is really not worlds apart from the supercharged petrols. It must be a massive difference compared to the ancient N/A 3.0 petrol (238 PS IIRC) from the S-Type that also was carried over early to X250s.
 
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Interesting insight/thoughts Tom, thank you. :cool:

The "When in sport+dynamic the throttle response of the XFS is really not worlds apart from the supercharged petrols." is probably going to get you lambasted though.... :D
 

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Interesting insight/thoughts Tom, thank you. :cool:

The "When in sport+dynamic the throttle response of the XFS is really not worlds apart from the supercharged petrols." is probably going to get you lambasted though.... :D
:D I've said it before and nobody who really compared the two could disagree.

I think the diesel gets a bit unfairly criticised for its turbo lag. The modern petrols on the other hand, even though they're supercharged and even the V8, need their revs before they really shift. Then of course the petrols just keep going and going up in the rev range while the diesel runs out of puff. That along with the noise is the big difference.

If you compare the throttle response itself of an XFS around peak torque and a supercharged petrol around peak torque I think the difference is minimal in terms of instant shove in the back. Mind you, a remapped XFS has more torque (for a while at least ;)) than an XFR.
 
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(y)
 

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:D I've said it before and nobody who really compared the two could disagree.

I think the diesel gets a bit unfairly criticised for its turbo lag. The modern petrols on the other hand, even though they're supercharged and even the V8, need their revs before they really shift. Then of course the petrols just keep going and going up in the rev range while the diesel runs out of puff. That along with the noise is the big difference.

If you compare the throttle response itself of an XFS around peak torque and a supercharged petrol around peak torque I think the difference is minimal in terms of instant shove in the back. Mind you, a remapped XFS has more torque (for a while at least ;)) than an XFR.
This. Very true.

I've said it before - the 3.0TD has masses of low end grunt / shove / torque. Just wish it carried it past 5000rpm

The 3.0 Petrol is beaten by the 3.0 Diesel - until about 30/35mph - then the supercharger and bigger lungs of the petrol take over - and it just keeps building.

I love it.

Would I buy another 3.0TD. Not if there was a 3.0 P SC about.

Would I turn my nose up at a 3.0TD. No, certainly not. Still a fantastic engine that has been demonised by ecomentalists.
 
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
it seems everyone knows 3.0D is better overall unless you are on a race track!

If you want to enjoy It every day, XF S have everything you need. I like the instant punch and quick shifts due to smaller range of rev. Better economy and more reliability due to having a less complex engine. If I want more I go for an F-type.

I don’t like the engine sound on my car and love the smoothness of a petrol engine but luckily the sounds does not reach to cabin that much. And I like this one which I have already enabled:
180377
 

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Or you get an XF with an F-Type engine. ;)

Not sure I'd say that the diesel is less complex or more reliable than the petrols, especially if you take this DPF business into account (even if the issues are caused by incorrect use).

The only thing I never got used to with my XFS was the sound... the engine noise, injector clattering when it was cold and exhaust drone in the cabin on idle, but then again some people said they thought it sounded good on the outside. Like Rigger I've been there, done that, got the T-shirt with the diesel but still think it's a bloody good engine and the sweet spot if fuel economy matters.

Anyways good to see there's a solution to clean even a pretty seriously clogged up DPF. I only got an amber DPF warning once in my old XFS and that was after only driving in crawling traffic for hours something like 5 days in a row.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Just an update. After about 500miles of short trips the warning was back. Luckily I was about to make 200miles round trip and it cleared after about 20miles. I’m surprised how fast it gets full.
 

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Just my 5 cents.
I did the forced regen today just to see how the process works. Used SDD to start the process. Car is x250 3.0D 240PS MY13, ~196k on the clock.
Initial soot value was 13.4 and engine temp was 84 degrees, so it was still warm from the drive to city. I started the process on the edge of the city. So inital speeds where upto 60km/h for 3-4km.
Soot value dropped to 13.3 while in the city. Next 8km I drove around 112km/h and soot level did not drop at all.
Then I lowered the speed to 96km/h and it started to drop right away. Within 10km soot level dropped to 4.5 and that was where I arrived home and stopped the process.
So for me it seemed that the sweetspot for regen was around 96km/h.
Overall trip was little less than 24km and less than 30 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just my 5 cents.
I did the forced regen today just to see how the process works. Used SDD to start the process. Car is x250 3.0D 240PS MY13, ~196k on the clock.
Initial soot value was 13.4 and engine temp was 84 degrees, so it was still warm from the drive to city. I started the process on the edge of the city. So inital speeds where upto 60km/h for 3-4km.
Soot value dropped to 13.3 while in the city. Next 8km I drove around 112km/h and soot level did not drop at all.
Then I lowered the speed to 96km/h and it started to drop right away. Within 10km soot level dropped to 4.5 and that was where I arrived home and stopped the process.
So for me it seemed that the sweetspot for regen was around 96km/h.
Overall trip was little less than 24km and less than 30 minutes.
👍🏻
Yes I noticed that revving the engine as people do will slow the process. Instead driving around 60mph but playing with the pedal as explained in first post will speed it up. Also it doesn’t do in it one go. It tend to stay at some levels for a while and then drops.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you for the insight, Hamed. I have a DPF light on in my car at the moment was wondering if I should try a dpf cleaner before I take it to a garage?

Are these any good? The Best DPF Cleaner on the Market in 2020 | Czok

Thanks in advance,

Naomi x
If it’s an amber warning just drive the car for 20-50miles on an a-road or motorway. It will regenerate itself.

my personal experience is that fuel additives will shorten the life span of plastic parts and seals.So they would me my last solution.
 
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