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Makes you wonder if there have been hub machining issues from the factory that have never fully been resolved and it's been the luck of the draw if you get a good catch or not. Just seems strange that some of us have had set after set failing and some have had no issues at all.
Agreed, could also be down to driving techniques, the Jaguar setup is very sensitive to heat spots and pad contamination.

Kim has stated what he does to best manage the sensitive brakes, I've never worried about not applying my brakes when I stop (if I was on a track, then yes) never even serviced the brakes on the 6, with no issues.
 

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Your roads are not twisty like ours lol.

I drive all my cars the same and never have issues in the others, the 6 series I had for nearly 3 years, not even a murmour.

I believe that part of the problem with the Jaguar brakes is the design, single piston sliding calipers on big discs are not the best, even the XFR only has twin pots, the competition are streets ahead on braking.
You have a point there Dave. We have plenty of twisty roads, but they are all in the hills where I rarely drive any more, my boy racer days are long gone.
But even then other than in the twisties I use the brakes very sparingly, and a set of Jag rotors would probably last me around 100,000 miles if I ever let them get anywhere near that low before I replaced them. Same with the pads, I have never gotten even vaguely close to wearing out a single pad, they have always had at least 2/3 left before I decided to replace them. Every time replacing rotors and/or pads was a choice I made to move to something better, for looks/noise/dust reasons etc. My current rotors did about 10,000 miles on the XFR and they have done nearly the same on the F-Type (well the fronts at least) and they pretty much haven't worn at all, with zero lip that I can feel.
After well over 40 years of driving I think I have worked out why I am so stingy on brake wear.
I brake much less often and much less severely than 99% of other drivers, because I concentrate 100% on my driving and I observe and anticipate what is going on around me and ahead of me, and not just 2 car lengths ahead but several 100 yards ahead. That way I know if I may need to slow down way before everyone else around me and in front of me is slamming on the skids, I just find it both safer and smoother. Until my first Jag, the XFS, I only ever owned manuals and I could go many miles barely touching the brakes, simply by anticipating and using the gears. The only exception is when I am having a fang along a twisty hills road but as I said I don't do that any more.
 

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You have a point there Dave. We have plenty of twisty roads, but they are all in the hills where I rarely drive any more, my boy racer days are long gone.
But even then other than in the twisties I use the brakes very sparingly, and a set of Jag rotors would probably last me around 100,000 miles if I ever let them get anywhere near that low before I replaced them. Same with the pads, I have never gotten even vaguely close to wearing out a single pad, they have always had at least 2/3 left before I decided to replace them. Every time replacing rotors and/or pads was a choice I made to move to something better, for looks/noise/dust reasons etc. My current rotors did about 10,000 miles on the XFR and they have done nearly the same on the F-Type (well the fronts at least) and they pretty much haven't worn at all, with zero lip that I can feel.
After well over 40 years of driving I think I have worked out why I am so stingy on brake wear.
I brake much less often and much less severely than 99% of other drivers, because I concentrate 100% on my driving and I observe and anticipate what is going on around me and ahead of me, and not just 2 car lengths ahead but several 100 yards ahead. That way I know if I may need to slow down way before everyone else around me and in front of me is slamming on the skids, I just find it both safer and smoother. Until my first Jag, the XFS, I only ever owned manuals and I could go many miles barely touching the brakes, simply by anticipating and using the gears. The only exception is when I am having a fang along a twisty hills road but as I said I don't do that any more.
100k miles on a set of rotors discs ;) that is Stigdaisy territory lol
 

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To apply some balance, I am on original discs. 45000 miles. Absolutely silky smooth braking. All Jaguar OEM pads. Yes like others I anticipate and go easy on the brakes, but there are times.......
 

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Another one here who had juddering on his X250.........intial OEM discs/pads had to be replaced in first few 1000 miles (steering wobble), then I used after market, which had judder.....

I will stick to OEM for my XE

Ran in plenty of new discs/pads on numerous cars with no issues
 

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Also had some brake judder on my last X250 a few years ago. I think it went away when I got new discs.

Really like your approach to braking Kim. I do like to drive my car to the max sometimes, but in everyday commuting I have exactly that mindset... anticipation and as much engine braking as possible, if braking is necessary at all. Makes wonders to brake longevity and fuel consumption.
 

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There is also a caveat that when fitting new discs, if judder/wobble is experienced you should re-position the disc on the hub as it might just be a balance issue. You may not have the balance spots lined up and they are working against you instead of for you
 

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I proved for me at least it was brake deposit on the disc. I sanded mine to prove my theory and it fixed it 90% and only because the sandpaper I used wasn't that heavy.
I done this to prove it was just brake meterial transfer. I used mintex discs and pads, so I don't think I'd use them again.
 

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Before I changed my discs I had judder. The fronts were OEM jag discs that had developed a lip . When I changed the pads it was fine for a while but then judder appeared exactly as John experienced and felt a bit worrying when slowing from speed almost like a death wobble.I changed the discs and pads both TRW and problem solved .Also noticed there is much less dust. Perfectly smooth now.
 

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To apply some balance, I am on original discs. 45000 miles. Absolutely silky smooth braking. All Jaguar OEM pads. Yes like others I anticipate and go easy on the brakes, but there are times.......
Mine was on it's original discs when I sold it at 116,000 miles. Braking is just a waste of diesel & the XF handles so well there's no need to brake for corners.:cool:
 

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Mine was on it's original discs when I sold it at 116,000 miles. Braking is just a waste of diesel & the XF handles so well there's no need to brake for corners.:cool:
Forgive me, but the M62 is fairly straight no? :rolleyes:
 

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You don’t need to brake for corners when you’re driving so slowly.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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You don’t need to brake for corners when you’re driving so slowly.


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I'd wager that your RS hasn't averaged 60mph in your tenure......let alone over 116,000 miles!:p:p
 

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Well, I think I can rule out warped discs.

Variation on nearside - 0.07mm. View attachment 89489 View attachment 89497

Variation on offside - 0.01mm. View attachment 89505 View attachment 89513

Not sure where to go now. Any suggestion?

Sent from my Nexus 10 and a Black XF-S 😎
Sorry for resurfacing this old thread but I am investigating a similar issue. Disassembled front discs and found a lot of copper grease on mounting surfaces that could be enough for causing runout. While cleaning I used sand paper to speedup the process. steering vibration reduced a lot but I now feel pedal pulsation. Turned out brake disc are “almost” as soft as aluminium when sanding. Nothing like steel. Then decided to use my small CNC to skim the disc but when I checked the WM I found the maximum allowable runout is only 0.02mm “installed”. I know the general perception in industry is 0.1mm and 0.02 seems very accurate to me. Because you have tried it before, can I ask a few questions:
1-did you put nuts on and torqued before using dial indicator?
2-when you installed new discs did you use the dial indicator and how mwas the variation?
3-when it happened again after several months did you use dial indicator again and what was the result?

Thanks
182332
 

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Discussion Starter #199
Hi Hammed,
Answers as follows:
1. No. At the time, the discs were solid and didn't need securing.
2. No. But I did make sure the surface contact area on the hub was smooth and clean. In retrospect, I should have measured the new ones for comparison.
3. Yes, I did. I didn't record the readings but remember that the run out was about the same. But what I did record at that time were the "images" of the pads on the disc surface. I think I posted photos.
 

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Thanks John. Tolerances from WM seem very tight for vibration curing but apparently if they are not met they will cause high spots over time that will cause brake pad imprints and eventually exceeding limits for vibration. This is my interpretation of what I have read so far.
 
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