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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
So the nice (ish) weather combined with all other chores mostly done had me back under the beast, preparing the front subframe for removal.

Steering rack removed - and dropped on fingers - ouch - getting the pich bolt out of the column knuckle was so much fun, removed brake calipers and drop links. I know I don't need to remove all these things but my experience of such tasks is to remove anything that may require a 1 metre breaker bar while attached to something solid. Also removed the road springs - that took a while and led to a revelation that makes me wonder how many good looking cars are hiding pretty dangerous secrets.

The spring turret on the drivers side is toast, not just corrosion but a significant amount of material no longer present - there is no way to see the damage with the spring in place so it could have passed an MOT, it is alas in my opinion dangerous, need to decide whether to weld or replace - £1400 for a new subframe and they are available to order ... this project just keeps getting better.

To top it all off I'm sure starting to feel the years getting down, getting up, rinse and repeat - it is getting pretty darn painful. The arthritis in my hands is currently beating a rhythm you could dance too - not to mention a few other places attempting to synchronise. A word of caution to those on the wrong side of 60 - money and time you may have, the willpower you may have - it may not be enough - I know now that the weather isn't the only enemy.

I'll take some pic's of the damage when I get the courage to get down on the floor again - only engine mounts and subframe mounts left, I'll pivot the subframe down on its front mounts/. For now I need to recover and get two clear days weather wise because I can't leave the engine support in place and close the bonnet so need to support the engine from below once the subframe is off, I plan to put my tall commercial vehicle axle stands under the engine mounts.
 

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Classics are not called "labours of love" for nothing..............persevere, but a rate that suits you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Classics are not called "labours of love" for nothing..............persevere, but a rate that suits you.
I don't plan to quit Wilf - just feels that way some times but then the pain goes away and I'm at it again .... I'll never learn ;-)

So the front subframe is off, first job this year to sort out the inner flitch panels that brought the project to a standstill, I'm still undecided whether to remove the damper mounts from the inner flitch panels - I know this is the best way but the spot welds holding them on aren't easy to see and they are too good to scrap even if I do have replacements (which I do). I need a decent day and better weather - then I could repair the damper mount off the car, repair the inner flitch on the car then marry the two. I can weld temporary guide plates in place to make sure they go back correctly.

Some pics of the subframe -

hidden damage on passenger side of the removed subframe.

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A hidden botched repair on the drivers side of the same subframe - I wonder what lurks behind that flat plate .... maybe I'll remove the plate and see.
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The carnage visible after removing the road spring - 50% of the spring support has returned to nature ...
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There are those that would say this is repairable, I'm afraid for me it isn't, the corrosion is all hiding in the section above the spring seat, the subframe needs to be totally dismantled so that it can be addressed and given the abuse this area gets it isn't a job for an amatuer - take that from an 'ex' pro ... I will not be attempting to repair this and I once earned a living in the motor trade.

Fortunately none of the inner flitch damage has extrended down into the chassis box itself, some surface stuff but clean metal at the top. Don't worry about mounts etc as I have new bushes / bolts and other sundries. What I do lack is a sand blaster to clean up my anti roll bar ... not sure whether I need one but I'm starting to think one would be useful even for spot repairs.
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You can see the corrosion cut out at the top centre, I'll do a better series of pics when I repair this stuff but for now the weather is too bad and I'm low on gas anyhow (Argon / CO2 for the MIG).

The chain is what supported the engine while I dropped the subframe, the engine mounts currently rest on top of a pair of 6 ton commercial axle stands - lot of cleaning up to do before the subframe goes back in.

And the subframe has been a saga in itself, despite them being advertised to order they are very much not available new. Consequently finding one in good condition is akin to finding a penny washer in a swimming pool while wearing a blindfold - and yes I succeeded - the price however was painful - pretty much the price I expected to pay for a new one. There is a lot of junk out there - my guess is that some of it is on otherwise pretty cars.
 

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My youngest son has set himself up with a 200L belt driven compressor and a pressure pot for blast cleaning wheels. It does a bit of wheel refurbishing on the side.

He blasted my MGB gearbox crossmember and steady bar. They came up beautifully with no visible holes.

He’s doing some other bits for me.

Very handy to have.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
I'm currently looking for that very tool - I already have a pretty large compressor although 50 litres less (Clarke XEV16/150), used for all kinds of things. Seriously looking at getting a sandblaster the goal being to do spot repairs on the chassis / body, larger cleaning such as brake calipers and anti roll bar. I have had enough or wire brush and other nonsense only to have rust burst back though in months.

Currently deciding whether to get a cabinet and one of the simple top feed guns or a blast pot - I'm leaning more toward the cabinet.
 

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Cabinet would be good, the sand goes everywhere.

Dan got a 1m3 water container, the ones on a pallet. He’s added a window and two sealed gloves at the front.
The filler cap is an LED lamp now for visibility.
He cut a big door in the back so he can add wheels in with tyres on.
He then welded up a tubular wheel pivot so he can turn the wheel without opening the cabinet. The pivot is removable.

With a bit of fine wire mesh, he’s able to sieve the blasting sand and reuse it.

It’s all in a small lean to to keep the mess contained. Despite the work he’s done on the cabinet it’s not dust tight.

Get a good respirator mask with removable filters and sealed goggles if you’re doing it in a confined space.

HTH
 

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You're safe on here Ben.. ;)

Dave (@Ancill ) is well versed in using man maths when having conversations with his other half about car/motor cycle expenditure.. and would no doubt offer help or guidance if needed!.. :D
Or he can recommend the nearest hospital for running repairs to the body!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #70 ·
Well the new subframe is here - well not new but about as good as it gets now - compared to my old one it is so pretty, almost qqualifies as Jaguar porn ... If she finds out what I spent I'm definitely dead ...

if anyone has any good ways to remove powder coat I'm all ears. It doesn't respond to wire wheel, it clogs flapper wheels, the sand blaster would need several tons of grit to strip this thing as that struggles too.

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Well the new subframe is here - well not new but about as good as it gets now - compared to my old one it is so pretty, almost qqualifies as Jaguar porn ... If she finds out what I spent I'm definitely dead ...

if anyone has any good ways to remove powder coat I'm all ears. It doesn't respond to wire wheel, it clogs flapper wheels, the sand blaster would need several tons of grit to strip this thing as that struggles too.

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Always used a blaster to remove powder coat
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
What grit did you use ? , aluminium oxide is way too expensive to put all over the floor in the quantities this is going to take
 

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What grit did you use ? , aluminium oxide is way too expensive to put all over the floor in the quantities this is going to take
Ahh, for that bit, I’ve always used a blaster, I don’t have the facilities, but never found it expensive
 

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Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Oh as in you got somebody else to do the dirty work - got it -

I invested in a pressure pot and a cabinet (so I can do all kinds of other bits too - not only on the Jag but My SST's and Sabre)
 

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Oh as in you got somebody else to do the dirty work - got it -

I invested in a pressure pot and a cabinet (so I can do all kinds of other bits too - not only on the Jag but My SST's and Sabre)
It’s ok having a small blasting unit for small parts, but for a large unit to blast large parts, made no sense for me, I would only use it a few times, then it would be in the way lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Couldn't agree more - that's why I got the pressure pot - I couldn't justify a cabinet large enough for a subframe. The SST's / Sabre have a front 'armature' that the lights etc mount on, I have two that need some TLC so it made sense to get a pot - I also have a Reliant Kitten Chassis that I want to clean up and paint, I no longer have the van so have no way to transport it.

I just wasn't ready for how much media these things blow through - need to work out some recovery plan to re-use some of it - more spending ... maybe use a large sheet and one of the marquee's - except the Jag has no wheels and prevents that idea currently as a result. I didn't think the wheels / subframe would be off or I'd have parked the XJS somewhere else before I started.
 

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Couldn't agree more - that's why I got the pressure pot - I couldn't justify a cabinet large enough for a subframe. The SST's / Sabre have a front 'armature' that the lights etc mount on, I have two that need some TLC so it made sense to get a pot - I also have a Reliant Kitten Chassis that I want to clean up and paint, I no longer have the van so have no way to transport it.

I just wasn't ready for how much media these things blow through - need to work out some recovery plan to re-use some of it - more spending ... maybe use a large sheet and one of the marquee's - except the Jag has no wheels and prevents that idea currently as a result. I didn't think the wheels / subframe would be off or I'd have parked the XJS somewhere else before I started.
If the subframe is in sound condition with most of the coating secure, why not wire brush back the areas that are compromised and then give the whole chassis a coat of POR15?
ive had very good results with that coating, far more durable than powder coating
 

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Discussion Starter · #78 ·
This is one of those OCD things, it is also an age thing - I just don't want to be under this thing much once done, I sure don't want to be pulling the subframe off again. It may be a simple task in your 30's - not so much in your 60's.

I do intend to ensure the car's chassis where it is concealed by all this stuff is addressed before it goes back on. I've no experience of POR15 though I've often heard it recommended - am I allowed to mention old engine oil and paraffin these days. Although I don't plan that this car should ever see the rain again I can't stop condensation nor control the weather, I don't want anything that water can creep up behind leaving a nice pretty face and an absolute disaster under the skin - time to dig into POR15.
 

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This is one of those OCD things, it is also an age thing - I just don't want to be under this thing much once done, I sure don't want to be pulling the subframe off again. It may be a simple task in your 30's - not so much in your 60's.

I do intend to ensure the car's chassis where it is concealed by all this stuff is addressed before it goes back on. I've no experience of POR15 though I've often heard it recommended - am I allowed to mention old engine oil and paraffin these days. Although I don't plan that this car should ever see the rain again I can't stop condensation nor control the weather, I don't want anything that water can creep up behind leaving a nice pretty face and an absolute disaster under the skin - time to dig into POR15.
So long as the substrate and current coating is sound, POR15 will do the job and remain sound for many years to come.
Wear gloves on application, if you get it on your skin, you are wearing it for weeks lol
 

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I have found that powdercoats are unreliable on edges, POR15 does a far better job.
 
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